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Your Defense in a Colorado Criminal Case

Being charged with a criminal offense is a frightening experience, no matter what level of crime. Some of my clients are doctors, nurses, or other professionals that have been charged with a relatively minor misdemeanor offense – but one that will nonetheless ruin their career if they are convicted. Other clients of my firm are facing extremely serious felony charges, sometimes as repeat offenders, and are trying to avoid lengthy prison sentences. Regardless of your situation, avoiding convictions and minimizing penalties is the goal of good representation.

The route that is taken toward avoiding convictions and minimizing penalties is unique to every criminal defense case. The judgment and experience that comes from repeatedly representing the accused is essential in helping my clients to get good results. Naturally, every person that is charged with an offense would like to have their case dismissed. While I do get cases dismissed from time to time, this only happens in cases where the evidence can be clearly demonstrated to be false – or where a conviction is unjust for other reasons. In other cases, my client must successfully fight the charges in a trial before a jury in order to walk away with no convictions.

The above are examples of the very best results possible. However, not all cases can be won at trial, and the district attorney does not dismiss all cases before trial. The result is that many cases result in plea bargains. When a prospective client asks, “What results can you promise me?,” the honest answer is that it depends on the facts and evidence in your case. First, it is unethical for a criminal attorney to guarantee results in any criminal matter. Second, there is never a guarantee at the outset of a criminal case as to what the result will be. There are too many uncertain variables involved, including who the judge and district attorney are going to be, and what decisions they will make. Further, the evidence of the case must also be examined and fully developed before any conclusions can be drawn.

Another question often posed to me is “How successful are you?” And the honest answer is, like the above answer, it depends on the specifics of the case at hand. Criminal defense attorneys do not measure their own success by “wins” or “losses.” Instead the question is, “How good were the results relative to how bad they could have been.” Naturally, in the case of a win at trial, or a complete dismissal of the charge – the results are a pure “win.” However, success or failure in a criminal case is often a matter of degree, not a black-and-white win or loss.

What clients of my law office can absolutely expect is that I will use all of my legal knowledge and experience to put them in the best position possible at the outcome of their criminal case. My experience evaluating cases, developing defense cases, and representing people in the courtroom will be utilized to the best extent possible on your behalf.

While Your Case Proceeds

Criminal DefensesFollowing some basic guidelines while your case is under way will help you to achieve the best possible results in your case.

Remaining Silent

Your right to remain silent stays with you throughout the entire process. Please do not discuss the allegations with anyone except me, and those that are working on your case with me.

Good Behavior

Whether you are on bond or not, any sort of new criminal offense or other bad behavior that occurs during the pendency of your case will have a harmful effect on both the perceptions of the judge and the district attorney in your case. This will only make it more difficult to get the best possible result.

Dress and Demeanor

Always be courteous in and around court. Be sure to dress in the most professional clothes that you have, and do not be late for court – or miss court altogether. We want the court to be clear that you have respect for the process, and for the authority of the court.

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